The Core Message

It was represented to me that in my approach to the New Testament gospels I was missing the “core message,” and in the process I was seemingly denying the central tenant of Christianity, namely that Jesus is God. Although certainly central to Christian faith today, the notion that Jesus is God – that he was always and will forever be God – was not always quite so simple. Although it is evident that Christians believe Jesus is now God, there was at one point in time an extensive debate regarding the relationship between God and Jesus, a debate which ultimately culminated in the doctrine of the Trinity.

Continue reading “The Core Message”

Christianity without God?


Is it possible for Christianity to exist without the notion of God/Yahweh?  Does Christianity require the existence of a deity?  Certainly the doctrine of the ‘Holy Trinity’ is predicated on the notion that God exists and was made physically manifest in Jesus of Nazareth, psychologically or “spiritually” in the ‘Holy Spirit’/’Holy Ghost’, and remains nebulous as ‘God the Father’, but it is necessary to point out that this dogma was a much later addition to the teachings of the early church and certainly those of Jesus of Nazareth.

Can one have a Jesus without a God?  The answer is simply, yes.  Denying or disregarding the question of Jesus’ divine character does nothing to undermine the power and meaning of his words, particularly if we accept the following quotation’s author who argues that by being true to our most genuine selves, then we are being true to God.  It is not a difficult leap to realize that God is not a power outside of us, but is in fact manifest in each of us.  But God is not some deity or power, it is merely the goodness within us which craves honesty and openness from others and from ourselves.

Continue reading “Christianity without God?”

Pt.1: Yahweh holds a grudge…


God’s love is not unconditional.

Though the New Testament and the teachings of Jesus of Nazareth imply that through grace God forgives and saves, the notion that God dispenses love unconditionally and equitably is a lie.  The God of Abraham, of Isaac, of Jacob, of Moses, of David — this same god is not the merciful, peace-loving deity which Jesus makes him out to be.  In point of fact, the distinction between God (“the Father”)  and Jesus is so stark that one is left to wonder if the act of being made mortally manifest changed the supernatural entity to be more merciful and more understanding than the temperamental, crazy-ex-level  jealous God of the Old Testament.  No wonder Ridley Scott thought to portray the Hebrew God as an insidious preteen who taunts the reticent Moses.

Continue reading “Pt.1: Yahweh holds a grudge…”